Friday, July 29, 2016

Highlights from the 2016 Twin Peaks Festival

Hot damn that pie Is good!

I was invited by Twin Peaks Unwrapped to talk about my experience as a first time attendee along with some other great people from the festival. Listen here ---> Twin Peaks Unwrapped 60: Twin Peaks Fest 2016

Earlier this year I promised myself that no matter what I needed to get to the 2016 Twin Peaks Festival. With that being said, I was determined to make it happen and I'm happy to say I can now check attending the festival off my bucket list. Initially I was expecting to go alone, because the tickets sold out super fast. However as the festival approached more tickets became available and I was able to snag one for my friend. It had been years since we were able to take a girls trip together so getting her a ticket made me even more excited to attend. Since she had never seen the series all the way through, she volunteered to binge watch it with Fire Walk With Me and the Missing Pieces in preparation. After which we set off, just two New Jersey girls heading out to North Bend, WA for an adventure we hoped would be both wondrous and strange.


Fall City Roadhouse





There were two events at the Roadhouse. The first is an unofficial festival event called The Mixer on Thursday. It's basically a gathering of whoever wants to attend and a chance for people to mingle before the official events kick off. I was definitely nervous going in, but after a couple drinks and chatting with some terrific folks, I felt right at home. I got to meet some really cool people and got to snap some terrific pictures with Bonnie Aarons, who was super approachable and just plain fun. On the last night everyone returned to The Roadhouse for an evening of some very lively karaoke performances. 

Snoqualmie Falls 




Seeing the falls in person was a very surreal experience for me, as I imagine it is for most Twin Peaks fans when they see it for the first time. It's much bigger than I imagined and quite breathtaking. Standing there watching the water flow made me understand why Lynch/Frost were so enchanted by the falls; they are truly magical. 

Twede's Cafe aka The Double R Diner









Going to the diner might have been my favorite part of the trip. It has been remodeled to look as it did in the show so walking inside felt like I literally walked right into the heart of Twin Peaks. Our waitress was very friendly and she never stopped pouring the coffee. I expected to see Windom Earle in his motorcycle get up at the counter or for Shelly to stroll over to ask if I wanted more pie at any moment. I loved it there!

Ronette's Bridge







Visiting the bridge was also a surreal experience. Not only because it's such an iconic scene from the pilot of Twin Peaks, but also because the bridge itself has a quiet yet ominous feel to it. As I walked around I could see why it was chosen; there truly is a mysterious aura about it. 

Welcome to Twin Peaks




As I rounded the corner from Ronette's bridge, I was greeted by the festival's official Twin Peaks sign set in the exact location where Dale Cooper first sees it upon entering Twin Peaks in the series. That was definitely a favorite moment and made the experience of being in North Bend feel very real to me.

Celebrity Diner Night






The celebrity dinner was arguably my favorite event. Not only because of the great Q&A session with the actors, which can be heard in the above link to the TP Unwrapped podcast, but also because it was a chance to get up close and personal with the stars. I'm not a star chaser by any means, but it was a real treat to simply be standing outside when Russ Tamblyn walked out. He said he was tired and ready to go home, there were only a few people there so I asked for picture and he kindly agreed. At the same time, Madchen Amick  pulled up and walked right over to us to say hi. She is as bubbly and as gorgeous as you can imagine in real life. That was a special moment for me, followed by going back inside and having a chance to snap a picture with the lovely Laura Harring, who is also a knock out and was incredibly positive about her experience working with David Lynch. Also they set up a Black Lodge room where you can take pictures and outside of that was the incredible One Eyed Jacks sign, as seen above. All in all, it was a very special night!


Lynch Movie Night



The Lynch movie night had a real cool vibe to it. The theater is in North Bend right around the corner from Twede's cafe. The evening's feature film being shown was Mulholland Drive, which Laura Harring gave a sweet introduction for. However proceeding that was a showcase of the fan video finalists who entered the short film contest for the festival. Personally I enjoyed seeing that a lot. Since starting my blog it has amazed me how dedicated, creative and inspired the fans truly are by Twin Peaks. Everyone's work was great and after Mulholland Drive started to play, it was interrupted by a special performance by Julie Cruise. Unfortunately for me, like a idiot, I stepped outside at the wrong moment and missed it. I heard it was very special so if anyone has any footage of that, please send it my way. That is probably my biggest regret of the trip. However I did get a choppy video of Madchen talking about her directorial debut for her daughter's upcoming music video. Watch Below!


Olallie State Park




 





The picnic was a nice relaxing day where you can see the Dear Meadow Sheriff's station, the river where Teresa Bank's body was floating and tour some sites from scenes where Fire Walk With Me was filmed. Also several of the celebrities showed up. I had a chance to have a friendly chat with Gary Bullock not only about Fire Walk With Me, but also just about normal life things. He told me that during the filming of FWWM David Lynch told him to slow his dialogue down to the point where it was uncomfortable and then it would be right. He also said David has a way of bringing the best out of his actors. Then we went on to talk about our mutual love of dogs and his struggles with getting his fiction novel, Elsewhen, published. As an aspiring author, I found that conversation to be a real treat!

View of Mount Si
In a final thought, I think the overall experience for me was super positive. Not only did I completely geek out as a fan girl, but along the way I met some incredible people that not only welcomed me, but made me feel like I made new friends. Since coming home I've felt a bit of sadness at how quick it went and for the things I didn't get to do while I was there, but that's just some good motivation to return someday. Until then, I'll be in and out of the shadows! ;)



If you haven't seen it yet, check out Mark Frost's book trailer for 'The Secret History of Twin Peaks' he'll be signing in NYC on Oct 20th. I think I need to be there so maybe I'll see some of you then.



Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Recap of Episode 13

I saw so much!

Season 2 Episode 13


Written by: Harley Peyton & Robert Engels

Directed by: Lesli Linka Glatter

Original Air Date: November 3, 1990


"You lie and you betray and then you laugh about it!"

At Harold's house, he scolds Donna and Maddy for invading his privacy. Somberly, he tells Donna that he thought she was different and she made him feel like he could return to the world. Harold tells her that he invested his heart and soul in her, but she ended up being just like all the others who lie, betray and laugh about it. Then he tries to grab for Laura's diary and right then James bursts in and grabs the girls. They all run out, but leave the diary behind despite Donna making one last attempt to grab for it. Outside Donna and James fall to the ground and Donna asks James to hold her. Maddy looks on appearing out of place. Poor Harold is left behind in his house and manically starts misting his orchids before letting out a loud woeful cry. Later Maddy drives home and in private, James and Donna talk about what happened. James says if they could put their hearts together forever, they would be safe no matter what. Donna likes what she hears, they agree to be together and then James feverishly makes out with Donna's neck.

"Can you see me Daddy?"

An owl watches outside the Bookhouse as Dale, an unknown bookhouse boy and Hawk bring Audrey inside. Dale puts her on a bed, checks her vitals and notices needles marks on Audrey's arms. Audrey speaks in a drugged voice asking, "Can you see me Daddy? Can you catch me?"then cries, "Hand on my throat. It hurts me. Black hole. I can't breathe. Help me. Please help me! I'm sinking!" Dale shakes her and tells her that he's with her. Audrey then wakes up, sees Dale and gasps in relief saying that she prayed he would come. Then he holds her as she cries. Later Dale goes to see Harry at the station and tells him that heroin nearly killed Audrey. Harry shows Dale a picture of Jean Renault and tells him that he saw Jean watching a video of Dale at One Eyed Jacks. Dale realizes that Jean was really after him and used Audrey to do it. Dale gets upset and says this isn't the first time someone he cared about got hurt in the name of him doing what he has to do. Harry tells Dale he's the best law man he has ever known, but sometimes he thinks too much. 

"Goodnight, Mr. Horne."

Dale goes to The Great Northern to return Ben's money to him and coldly recounts what happened to Audrey at One Eyed Jacks. Ben pretends to be surprised when Dale tells him that Blackie was involved in Audrey's kidnapping and that Blackie was subsequently murdered by Jean Renault. Ben acts like he doesn't know either of them and is eager to count his money. Then Dale says Audrey is recovering from a drug overdose. That news seems to resonate some emotion in Ben and he sighs, "Oh my god!" Ben asks if he can see her. Dale tells him Audrey is resting comfortably and he will call him in the morning. Ben then impulsively hugs Dale and thanks him for bringing Audrey back to him. Dale is obviously uncomfortable with the hug and quickly says, "Goodnight, Mr. Horne." Then he walks out while Ben grabs his money and heads off in the other direction. 

At Shelly and Leo's house, Bobby tries to push Leo around in his new wheelchair with a bit of struggle. Shelly and the insurance agent watch from the living room as the agent commends Shelly and Bobby for taking care of Leo at home. Shelly refers to Bobby as "cousin Bobby" and says they will be there for Leo full time. Then the agent gives Shelly her check, which she's excited to open. However when she does, Shelly looks crestfallen and asks if there's been a mistake. Bobby comes over to look and barks, "$700? We're supposed to get $5000 a month!" The agent admits its sad and nervously explains that once taxes, equipment fees and maintenance costs all take their cut off the top that's all thats left. Then the agent quickly walks out. After Shelly gets upset and says she quit her job for this and Bobby better think of something. Bobby yells that he is thinking, but both of them are quickly silenced by Leo making an unexpected groan.

"Really Weird Stuff!"

Donna tells Harry about Laura's secret diary and Harold Smith in the sheriff's interrogation room. Harry says they already have Laura's diary and gets frustrated wondering if Donna and James are up to something. He sharply reminds her of what happened to Dr. Jacoby the last time they played games. Donna swears that James isn't involved and it's not a game. Harry softens and says he'll have someone go check on Harold as soon as he can, but he can't promise anything. Right then Gordon Cole walks past loudly saying he's looking for, "a Sheriff Harry S. Truman." Harry says he found him. Gordon then comes inside and introduces himself. 

He and Harry step outside where Gordon tells Harry to speak up, because his hearing is gone and it's a long story. He also mentions that his earplugs are cranked up to the max. Gordon then tells Harry that Albert won't be coming back, but he has the report on Albert's findings. Gordon goes on to say that fibers found outside of Cooper's room when he was shot were from a vicuna coat. (that is a nod to the film Sunset Boulevard, as is the name Gordon Cole) Harry repeats, "coat was vicuna." Confused, Gordon responds by saying that sounds good, but he already ate. Gordon also tells Harry that Albert found the contents of the One Armed man's syringe and it's, "really weird stuff." Also Gordon says there were papers found near the train car from a diary. Then the One Armed man is brought in by one of the deputy's. Gordon yells, "there's the One Armer now!" Harry suggests that everyone move into his office.

At the Bookhouse, Ben comes to see Audrey and they have an awkward exchange. Ben wonders about the things that Audrey must of have seen and claims he was worried sick about her. Dale looks on irked by Ben's fake concern. Audrey responds, "I saw so much!" Ben whispers that they'll work it out together. Audrey coldly nods, "Yes Daddy, you and I!" Then Audrey asks if Agent Cooper can take her home. At first Ben answers yes, but then he suggests they all go together. Audrey is clearly frustrated by Ben's interference.

"Let's go park by the lake and neck!"

Nadine comes home with a ton of enthusiasm and a bunch of packages in her arms. She can't believe that no one looked at her funny when she used the charge cards. She asks when her parents are coming back from Europe. Ed answers, "pretty soon." Then Nadine says she wants them to pretend like they're married and the place is theirs to fool around in. She excitedly punches Ed in the gut and then tosses him on the couch. Ed goes stiff in disbelief. Nadine then jumps on him saying she wants to park by the lake and neck, but then realizes they can just stay home and do that.

"They'll bury us side by side!"

At the Packard's, Josie lays on the couch half dressed while cousin Jonathan buckles his pants up. She asks him to please leave, but he laughs and tosses her a one way ticket back to Hong Kong. Josie tells him she hasn't received her insurance money yet and she's waited for five years to receive it. Jonathan tells her that Mr. Eckert is waiting for her. Josie gets insistent saying he can't make her leave and they have an arrangement. Cousin Jonathan grabs her and threatens to kill Harry if she doesn't meet him at midnight. He says that's their new arrangement. 

Later Josie goes to see Ben in his office and demands her money. Ben tries to smooth talk her and begins kissing her neck, but Josie snaps that she won't leave without her money. She warns Ben not to play games with her. Ben shows her a key to his hotel safe claiming that inside is enough dirt to bury her. In response, Josie shows him a key to a safe deposit box in another city with information that could lock him away for three lifetimes. Josie laughs, "They'll bury us side by side!" She then pulls away and insists on cash. Ben takes the check from Tojamura and signs it over to Josie. She hands him the signed papers for the mill, takes the check and walks out. On her way out Ben says, "well played!"

"Is this goodbye?"

James meets Maddy by the lake and offers her an apology for what happened between them. Maddy thinks he looked at her and saw Laura, but notes that she liked it. Maddy tells him that growing up her and Laura were so close it was scary and it was as if they're brains were connected. Maddy also tells him she liked getting the chance to be Laura and she liked the way James looked at her. However she thinks he belongs with Donna. James thinks love shines a bright light on people when they're in it, but people can't be that way forever. Maddy responds, "sure you can." James smiles and says he wants to make the way his heart feels last forever. After Maddy lets him know she's going home tomorrow. James asks if this is a goodbye. Maddy answers, "I guess it is." Then she kisses him on the cheek, says goodbye and walks away. 

Back at Leo's, Shelly and Bobby get drunk while throwing a welcome home party for Leo. Bobby colorfully recounts all of Leo's various misdeeds while Shelly eggs him on playfully. Leo groans while sitting at the kitchen table with a kazoo in his mouth and sunglasses on. Bobby then takes Shelly and they start making out on the kitchen table in front of Leo. However when Shelly looks over at Leo it appears that Leo looks back. Shelly panics and screams. She jumps off the table and tells Bobby, "this is too creepy!" Bobby agrees and apologizes to Leo. He takes the kazoo and sunglasses off him and promises Leo they will make him happy. Then Bobby gives Leo his welcome home cake, which Leo promptly falls into face first. Bobby pulls Leo by his ponytail to get his face out of the cake and says its a good thing they didn't light the candles. Then he and Shelly both start laughing. 

"You remind me today of small Mexican Chihuahua!"

Dale comes into the Sheriff's station while Gordon Cole sits in his peripheral view. He immediately stops short without turning his head, points his finger toward Gordon and snaps his fingers. Then Gordon loudly smiles, "Agent Dale Cooper!" He gets up and the two men gladly shake hands. Gordon then tells Dale that, "you remind me today of a small Mexican Chihuahua," and asks to speak with Dale in private. They go into Harry's office, but Gordon speaks so loudly Harry and Hawk can hear everything they say from outside the door. Gordon talks about a previous time when Cooper had trouble in Pittsburgh and says he wanted to check on him. Cooper assures Gordon that his mind, body and spirit are up to the task at hand. Then Harry comes in and let's them know they can hear everything. Gordon tells Dale to invite Harry in. Gordon then shows Dale a chess move that came in the mail for him. Dale realizes it is an opening move from Windom Earle. Gordon notes they'll have to keep an extra close eye on Dale now.

Ben brings Leland into his office at The Great Northern saying that with Jerry on the road he needs Leland back. Ben claims he can appreciate what Leland's been through. However Ben wants to know if Leland is truly okay now. Leland tells him to test him out so Ben starts telling him about some issues he's having with the Icelanders and the arrival of Tojamura. While he's talking, Leland gets distracted by a stuffed white fox on the table behind Ben's couch and plucks a piece of hair from the fox right in front of Ben. Ben watches in confusion as Leland tucks the hair into his jacket pocket. However Leland then offers some good suggestions on how to deal with the Icelanders and says they can resurvey the land and if need be, they sink them into a black hole via escrow for six months. Ben is impressed and the men go in for an awkward hug. 

"Josie, I love you!"

Harry goes to see Josie and finds her leaving with cousin Jonathan, who she introduces to Harry as her assistant, Mr. Lee. Mr. Lee takes her bags to the car. Once alone, Harry asks where Josie is going. She tells him she sold the mill and she's going home. Harry can't believe it and kisses her. Josie is touched, but says she has to go. Mr. Lee walks back in, but Harry tells him to leave them alone so he walks back out. After Harry tells Josie not to go and says he loves her. Josie cries and asks him not to think badly of her. She starts walking to the door so Harry tells her he loves her again. Josie stops briefly, but ultimately walks out. Harry watches her with a destroyed expression on his face.

"I find adherence to fantasy troubling and unreasonable."

Ben and Mr. Tojamura have dinner at The Great Northern. Mr. Tojamura asks why Ben has a check for five million dollars and he has nothing. Ben says he doesn't know enough about him yet. Mr. Tojamura threatens to withdraw. Ben insists that's not necessary and tries to charm his way out of the conversation. He brings up what happened at the mill fire and all the problems it created. Mr. Tojamura says he knows about fire since his family was at Nagasaki. Ben looks shocked, but says he's sorry. Right then we hear Leland begin singing, "Getting to know you," in the dining room. Ben rolls his eyes and goes to try and get Leland off stage. However Leland ends up dragging Ben into the number uncomfortably and the two men briefly sing together. From the bar, Mr. Tojamura watches while Pete sits next to him. Pete asks if Tojamura likes musicals to which Mr. Tojamura quickly answers, "no!" Pete presses by asking, "Not even Fiddler on the Roof?" Tojamura answers that he finds adherence to fantasy troubling and unreasonable. Pete looks confused and realizes Tojamura isn't from Twin Peaks. He offers to buy him a sake. Mr. Tojamura says no thank you so Pete offers him a nice cold milk instead. 

"He is Bob, eager for fun!"

At the station, Dale, Hawk, Harry and Gordon sit with the One Armed man and Dale insists they deny him his medicine. Dale shows Philip a picture of Bob and asks why he lied about knowing Bob. Phillip says it wasn't him. Harry thinks they should give him the medicine, but Gordon says if they do they'll never see the other side. Philip begins to groan and thrash a bit, but then snaps out of it and calmly says, "there is no need for medicine." He then tells them he's truly an 'inhabiting spirit' named Mike. He explains that Philip is host to him. Dale says he spoke to him in his dream about Bob. Mike says Bob is his familiar. Dale asks where Bob comes from. Mike says that can not be revealed. Dale asks what Bob wants. Mike answers in a deep breathy tone, "he is Bob, eager for fun, he wears a smile, everybody run." 

Mike then explains how parasites attach to a life form and feed. He says Bob needs a human life form and he feeds on fear and the pleasures. Mike also explains that they used to be partners. He begins to say, "through the darkness of future past the magician longs to see, one chance out between two worlds, Fire Walk With Me." Dale chimes in remembering the phrase from his dream. Mike looks up with pleasure and explains that he saw the face of god and was purified so he cut his tattooed arm off. However he says he stays close to Philip inhabiting him from time to time so he can stop Bob. He also says Dale's sketch of Bob is Bob's true face, but only the gifted and the damned can see it. Dale asks if Bob is near them now. Mike says for nearly 40 years in a large house, surrounded by trees with different rooms, each alike, occupied by different souls night after night. Dale gets a knowing look on his face and spouts, "The Great Northern hotel!" Cue the dramatic music and we cut to a shot of the hotel.

End of show!

So many elements build up in this episode that are not only intriguing, but also a lot of fun. I found myself laughing several times during the episode, particularly with every Gordon Cole scene. David Lynch is so charming in his comedic performance as Gordon; is there anything this man can't do? Also Shelly and Bobby's party for Leo is quite entertaining. I don't know how they kept straight faces when Leo's face hit the cake. I also think Pete offering Tojamura a cold glass of milk is just hilarious. James gets the award for corniest dialogue in this episode, despite James Marshall's sweetness in his performance.

On a serious note, I love how it appears that Leland is just acting bizarre in the office scene with Ben, but in reality his taking of the fox hair is a shrewd set up by Bob, who is cleverly framing Ben right in front of his face. Also the scene with Mike at the end is quite good and adds lots of fun to the mystery of Bob. I'm not convinced Mike is telling Dale the whole truth though, nor am I convinced he's truly on Dale's side, but Al Strobel is terrific in his over the top delivery of this incredible dialogue. Watch below!









Friday, June 24, 2016

Eraserhead: Oh, I Don't Know Much Of Anything

Henry Spencer...trapped in a hell of his own design

Written & Directed by: David Lynch

Original Release Date: March 19, 1977


Thoughts on Eraserhead


While I'm actually old enough (sigh) to remember when David Lynch's “Eraserhead” was new, I didn't really discover his work until a little later in life. I'd read various articles and pieces on “Eraserhead”, back when no one really had any idea who Lynch was or what he was about. “Sci-fi”, “horror”, “midnight movie fare”, even in those days no one could resist trying to pigeonhole it. I watched it when it was first released on DVD and my initial reaction was, of course, “what the hell was that?”. Like with much of Lynch's work, however, certain details reveal themselves upon repeated viewings, thus I took another trip through Henry Spencer's dark and twisted reality just to see what my impression was all these years later.

 Knowing a bit more now regarding David Lynch than I knew during my first watch, it quickly became apparent that “Eraserhead” is definitely an autobiographical film, at least in a metaphorical sense. In fact, I was quite surprised by how very David-like Jack Nance's Henry is. In my opinion his mannerisms, his speech and even his walk brings Lynch to mind. Leave it to Jack Nance to channel David Lynch, huh? He's such a wonderfully odd actor and very sorely missed.

David Lynch and Jack Nance...twin sons of different mothers?
So what is Eraserhead about? I've read many reviews and opinion pieces about how the film is based on Lynch's own experiences as a young struggling artist and newly-minted father living in a grim urban American city, in his case, Philadelphia. Obviously anyone can see these themes running through the film; however in my opinion there's something far more broad and all-encompassing going on as well. 

Henry's "Tree Of Life"...barren, bleeding out & dying


The Pencil Works...conformity factory? Organized religion? Psychiatry? You'll have to ask Mr. Lynch.
Henry is trapped in a hell of his own making and it's cost him his soul. The artificial constructs of conformity, relationships and expectations have stripped him of everything meaningful and left him baffled, confused and troubled. His real identity, his own soul, has been replaced with a different entity, one he's forced to nurture and care for even though he finds no reward or fulfillment through it. His life is shrouded in darkness, cold, ugly, harsh darkness. Henry tries to hold onto the last pitiful remnants of his own soul, his own being, but that slips away as well. He tries to find fulfillment by going through the motions and even through a sexual encounter with his seductive neighbor, but all it accomplishes is sinking him even deeper into his own morass of confusion, doubt and self-loathing. The entity (aka The Baby) is still there, demanding attention and care, mocking him as he tries to do what's expected of him. Henry isn't really Henry, he's part of this entity and it's a part of him as well, a part of him that's been reduced to the point of being a mere prop in his own life. 

It meant nothing, Henry
Finally Henry faces this entity he's created and strips it down to reveal its true ugliness, which prompts him to kill it. He finally faces the horror of what's he's created in all its grotesque, vile reality. Only after he faces “the ugly truth” does he find “heaven” and light. And then the film abruptly ends.

This is who you have become, "Eraserhead"
Now I suppose some could see this movie as some sort of religious allegory, or perhaps the tortured soul of a young artist having great difficulty properly expressing and realizing his ideas while also struggling mightily with the pressures of a relationship, fatherhood and urban life. Or maybe it's something of a morality play about conformity, or a cautionary tale about relationships. I could really reach and say it's a scathing indictment of conformist capitalist culture and “selling out” one's artistic vision and personal integrity as well as a harsh look at how much we're willing to sacrifice in the name of love and sex, relationships and society's “expectations” in general. Ask a hundred Lynch fans and you'd get a hundred different answers.

The "ugly truth" = the path to enlightenment and bliss
Now speaking for myself, if I had to attempt to distill it all down and be really glib about it, I'd say “Eraserhead” is the story of a man who can't escape his own personal hell until he drags his own demons into the light and excises them himself. Only the truth finally sets Henry free and that truth is grotesque, painful and scary. Until he has the courage to face it in all its horror he'll never find true bliss. Obviously that's a rather simplistic synopsis and I'm sure that bigger fans of the film than I could spend days in the comment section shredding my silly personal analysis.

But having seen most of Lynch's films and TV work, that's what I got out of “Eraserhead”. As obtuse as it seemed when I first watched it (and the first time around the imagery and the pace can be unnerving) I was actually a little surprised at how “linear” and straight-forward (relatively speaking) it was. As with a lot of his work, sometimes it's not so much about “what's happening?” as it is about "why" it's happening. It definitely helps to have a little Lynch background going into “Eraserhead”, it's not too surprising that few knew what to make of it or Lynch when it was first released.

Another aspect that really jumps out is how many familiar Lynchian themes “Eraserhead” contains. Someone “lost” in a strange or surreal situation, a circular pool into which people disappear, trees (frequently in the background), oddly disquieting musical interludes featuring vaguely late-fifties-early sixties-ish pop music, archaic technology, the chevron floor of Henry's lobby, characters exhibiting strange tics and mannerisms and of course a mysterious femme fatale. Even back then the stylistic elements of what Lynch was trying to express were in place, the man has a vision and that vision is a specific one even in spite of the ambiguity he cloaks it in.

All in all it was a lot of fun to take a fresh-eyed look at a Lynch film that often seems to be somewhat dismissed as being a weird oddity. In my opinion, Lynch is often accused of being “weird for the sake of weird” and although he can indeed create some pretty weird imagery, his films resonate with his take on “the human condition”, for lack of a better way to describe it. He's tackling universal themes and truths in his films, he just takes a unique approach in doing so. 


Hope you enjoyed my relatively quick take! To read more of my work, check out my writing on ----> Son of Stuck Funky.